Reuters wins Pulitzer for photography, Alaska newspaper public service prize

first_imgThe Anchorage Daily News and ProPublica won the Pulitzer Prize for public service journalism for revealing one-third of Alaska’s villages had no police protection, while the photography staff of Reuters won the breaking news photography award for documenting last year’s violent protests in Hong Kong.The Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky, took home the breaking news honor for its coverage of hundreds of last-minute pardons issued by former Governor Matt Bevin. The prize for investigative reporting went to the New York Times’ Brian Rosenthal, who exposed how thousands of New York City’s taxi drivers had their lives ruined by predatory lending.The Pulitzer Prize for Reuters, a unit of Thomson Reuters , was the newsroom’s eighth since 2008, and fifth in the last three years. The Pulitzer Prizes, the most prestigious awards in American journalism, have been handed out since 1917, when newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer established them in his will. Monday’s announcement had been postponed for two weeks because some journalists on the Pulitzer board are covering the coronavirus pandemic and needed additional time to evaluate the entries.In normal years, the prizes are announced before a crowd at Columbia University in New York. On Monday, Dana Canedy, who administers the Pulitzers, delivered the news from her living room, after the 18 board members hashed out the finalists and winners in “virtual and digital debate.””Ironically, the very first time the Prizes were presented was June 1917 — less than a year before the 1918 outbreak of the Spanish Flu pandemic,” she said. “During this season of unprecedented uncertainty, one thing we know for sure is that journalism never stops.”The Anchorage Daily News series, which included contributions from the investigative site ProPublica, found rampant sexual abuse in rural villages that are largely populated by indigenous people, where law enforcement was effectively nonexistent.The public service award is generally seen as the most coveted Pulitzer. The 2020 prize winners were in 15 categories of journalism and seven book, drama and music categories. Topics :last_img read more

How Catholic order from the Philippines set up orphanage where sexual abuse occurred

first_imgThe Catholic Church, in this particular case Bogor Diocese, had washed its hands of the case, reiterating to the public that Angelo was not a Catholic brother. The diocese holds a letter dated Sept. 19, 2019 to be the basis of their claim. The letter said the BSMC was not a Catholic order and that Angelo should not wear a robe. But Angelo continues to wear the brown robe of a brother and along with other brothers from the BSMC, set up another orphanage after he walked free in December. He has continued these activities without any hindrance, collecting money from individual Catholic donors while Bogor Diocese has turned a blind eye.Obscure orderThe Jakarta Post investigated the BSMC and has found that it is an obscure Catholic order based in the Philippines. It has yet to receive any official acknowledgement from the Indonesian Catholic Church, although the BSMC has managed to convince several clergymen to recommend them. On Sept. 7, the Indonesian Bishops Conference (KWI) issued a circular to all bishops informing them about Angelo and the BSMC and to be careful in making decisions regarding anything related to the subjects.Yet, despite all this, the BSMC brothers including Angelo continue to woo donors and operate under a religious guise. How has this obscure order managed to do this for so long? How does the Indonesian Catholic Church verify whether an order is legitimate or not? Angelo, a native of Tanimbar, an island in Maluku, is still at liberty. He has changed his name to Brother Geovanny, and set up a new orphanage a few months after his release, living among vulnerable boys again, as well as a few other BSMC brothers. In spite of all the allegations, which have never been dropped, he has requested that the BSMC be given a permit to work under the supervision of the parent institution from Palangkaraya diocese in Central Kalimantan so that he can conduct missionary work using the name of the BSMC in the area after being rejected by Bogor diocese.On Sept. 19, 2019, five days after Angelo’s arrest, the Bishop of Bogor Paskalis Bruno Syukur issued an internal announcement declaring that BSMC was a questionable congregation because of a lack of legal documents and decrees required by the Catholic Church. Thus, according to Bogor diocese, Angelo was not a Catholic brother and therefore was banned from carrying out work on behalf of the church, emphasizing that any legal action against Angelo was solely related to him as an individual.The decision made by Bogor diocese was kept internal until Angelo’s story became known to the public through an investigation undertaken by The Jakarta Post in collaboration with Tirto.id. This prompted the KWI to issue its Sept. 7 circular.The Bishop of Palangkaraya Aloysius Maryadi Sutrisnaatmaka confirmed that he received the circular on Sept. 7. He told the Post that he had a meeting two days later to talk about Angelo’s request for recognition and supervision, which had been submitted to Palangkaraya diocese under the name of Geovanny.“We have decided to reject the BSMC,” Sutrisnaatmaka told the Post on Sept. 10.Apparently, Angelo’s notoriety exceeds that of his congregation reputation as very little is known about the BSMC, including among priests and leaders of the Catholic Church in this country. KWI executive secretary Ewaldus, for example, spoke very briefly about the congregation in response to the Post‘s question about the BSMC. “You must find other priests who know about it [the BSMC] because I am totally in the dark,” he said via a text message on Sept. 9.The BSMC has no official website that provides comprehensive information about its history, spirituality or its work either in the Philippines, where it is based, or elsewhere including in Indonesia, unlike other religious orders that are officially recognized by the Catholic Church.  The very limited information about the congregation is available only through old blog posts that seem to be individually crafted, and through the congregation’s Facebook page that mostly presents photos of the members and their activities.BSMP or BSMC?According to two posts available on internet sources that were accessible as of Sunday, the BSMC was originally called the Blessed Sacrament Missionaries of the Poor (BSMP). It draws on the compassion and charitable works of Mother Theresa of Calcutta in serving the poor. Headquartered in Binan City, the congregation has Brother Anthony Bautista as its leader. Angelo once claimed that Bautista was the “superior general”, the most senior leader of an order globally.The website, which is said to relate to the diocese of Malolos in the Philippines, says that Bautista, who was then a “temporary professed member of the Missionaries of Charity”, a religious congregation established by Mother Theresa in 1950, started to develop a community that later became the BSMP in around March 1990.It is unclear whether the Malolos diocese has recognized the BSMP or approves of its work in the area as the information available on the diocese’s website only mentions “though there was no formal declaration of the bishop’s affirmation of the suggestion [to build the BSMP community in the diocese], Bro. Anthony was instructed by the monsignor [Aguinaldo, a priest from a local parish, the first person whom Anthony met to seek approval to set up the intended religious community] to begin their aspirations already”. The diocese’s website also puts the BSMP in the category of “charitable institution” rather than “religious order” category. The Post could not reach the Malolos diocese for further clarification.Brother Angelo BSMC (second left, back row) poses with children in his orphanage. (Courtesy of Kokon Production YouTube Channel/-)It is also unclear when the BSMP changed its name to the BSMC. According to a blog post, the congregation was still called the BSMP until 2015 when it first came to Indonesia.BSMC leader Bautista, claimed to the Post via Skype call on Aug. 23 that the congregation had never been named the BSMP. “It [the BSMC] is the original name [of the congregation]. It has been the name [of the congregation] since the beginning,” he said.Traces of BSMC in IndonesiaAs an order for Catholic brothers, Angelo claimed the BSMC was introduced to Indonesia for the first time on March 10, 2015, when Angelo arrived in Depok. He told this story to Jakarta Archdiocese magazine, Hidup, last year. The website version of the two articles has been taken down since Angelo’s alleged crimes became public last month.An article about an orphanage in Depok, West Java, published by Catholic magazine Hidup. It includes a photo depicting the head of the orphanage, known as Brother Angelo Ngalngola, and Bogor Bishop Mgr. Paskalis Bruno. (Courtesy of/www.hidupkatolik.com)Angelo claimed to a Hidup journalist that he met Bishop Paskalis to seek his approval to carry out charitable works within the diocese’s territory also in March, but failed to obtain it as he was required to first provide documents in regard to his congregation, which was then called the BSMP. Angelo met Paskalis again for the second time three months later on May 18, during which meeting he was granted three-month probationary status to work. In a recent interview with the Post, Paskalis said that he only approved of Angelo helping teach English to children.Angelo’s leader, Bautista, flew from the Philippines to Depok five months later to meet Paskalis on Oct. 10, according to Angelo. That was the only meeting between the two leaders. Shortly after that, Angelo set up the Kencana Bejana Rohani foundation on Dec. 14.Still BSMC brotherBautista told the Post that Angelo was still a brother in the BSMC congregation despite the allegations and the legal process he had gone through. Bautista however provided contradictory statements regarding Angelo’s religious life throughout the interview. He for example told the Post that he had advised Angelo not to continue his religious life and drop his identity as a Catholic brother, and instead focus on serving the poor after he was informed about Angelo’s alleged sexual abuse against minors. But later he defended Angelo’s membership of the BSMC congregation and repeatedly emphasized that Angelo was still a BSMC brother.“If he wants to continue serving God, well that is no longer my business but his. It’s his decision. If he is using the name of the religious order, well it depends on him. I cannot stop him,” Bautista said.In an apparent insistence on marking the presence of the BSMC among other Catholic religious orders in Indonesia despite the controversies surrounding him and his congregation, Angelo fled to Palangkaraya recently to meet Bishop Sutrisnaatmaka to seek approval to carry out charitable works in the area.Sutrisnaatmaka told the Post that he had not discussed Angelo’s proposal with other priests in the diocese until he received the circular from the KWI on Sept. 7.BSMC sistersOther than the proposal for acknowledgment submitted by Angelo, the Palangkaraya diocese also received a similar request from sisters of the BSMC led by Sister Yulia on April 18, 2018. Unlike the proposal from the BSMC brothers, the Palangkaraya diocese is processing the BSMC sisters’ intention to carry out missionary work in the area as they could provide administrative documents required by the diocese including, among other documents, a constitution and a structure of the congregation.Recalling his conversations with Yulia and her fellow BSMC sisters during their first meetings, Sutrisnaatmaka told the Post that the sisters had undertaken their formative years to become Catholic sisters under the supervision of the BSMC congregation in the Philippines, but later declared separation from the BSMC community of brothers to ease their work in Palangkaraya, where the sisters have set up the Taman Fioreti orphanage.“They told me that they had separated themselves from the BSMC congregation in the Philippines and set up an independent BSMC congregation of sisters with a new constitution,” Sutrisnaatmaka said.He further explained that he did not care about what had happened with the BSMC congregation in the Philippines as his focus was only on supervising the BSMC sisters in obtaining church recognition.Palangkaraya diocese plans to make the decision on the fate of the BSMC sisters next year if they can fulfil all the conditions required by the diocese. As Bogor diocese has thrown doubt on the authenticity of the BSMC, Palangkaraya diocese might possibly dissolve the existing BSMC congregation of sisters and ask Yulia and five other sisters to join other congregations that have been officially recognized by Palangkaraya diocese.“But please bear in mind that the process is still ongoing. We haven’t made any decisions,” Sutrisnaatmaka stressed, adding that the process could take longer than expected.Topics : The Philippines-based Catholic religious order the Blessed Sacrament Missionaries of Charity (BSMC) was largely unknown to the Indonesian public until one of its members, Lukas Lucky Ngalngola, calling himself Brother Angelo and later Geovanny, put the congregation on the map, and for all the wrong reasons.Angelo allegedly abused orphanage boys under his care, sexually and physically. While the abuse against the boys who lived at the Kencana Bejana Rohani orphanage that Angelo set up in 2015 in Depok, West Java, was reported to the police in September last year, the crime was revealed to the public only very recently after victims and child protection activists spoke out in the media.Collective efforts coordinated by the state-sponsored Indonesian Child Protection Commission (KPAI) are being made to prosecute Angelo after a lack of action taken against him brought state institutions in charge of child protection, including the KPAI, as well as the Catholic Church, into the spotlight. He was arrested by the Depok Police in September 2019 but was released three months later as the police failed to complete the dossiers for the prosecutor’s office to bring the case to court.last_img read more

PLSA shrinks board in overhaul of governance structure

first_imgChris HoggGregg McClymontLaura MyersEmma Douglas, head of DC at Legal & General Investment Management (chair)Zoe Alexander, director of strategy at NESTAdrian Boulding, director of policy at NOW: PensionsRachel Brothwood, director of pensions at West Midlands Pension FundMel Duffield, pensions strategy executive at Universities Superannuation SchemeTeresa Fritz, member representative at Croydon Pension FundBrian Henderson, director of consulting at MercerChris Hogg, chief executive at National Grid UK Pension SchemeJamie Jenkins, head of pensions strategy at Standard Life AberdeenNicola Mark, head of the Norfolk Pension FundNeil Mason, head of pensions at Surrey County CouncilGregg McClymont, director of policy and external affairs at The People’s PensionLaura Myers, head of DC at Lane Clark & PeacockJackie Peel, UK and international benefits director at Mars UKAnna Rogers, senior partner at ARC Pensions LawMichael Watkins, head of proposition development at Smart PensionCarol Young, head of group pensions at Royal Bank of ScotlandJulian Mund spoke to IPE editor Liam Kennedy earlier this year about how the PLSA was changing and broadening its approach to representing the UK’s pensions industry. The UK’s pension scheme trade body has reduced the size of its main board and named 17 people to a new policy group as part of a major overhaul of its governance structure.The changes were announced last year at the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association’s (PLSA) annual conference. In May the association named Legal & General Investment Management’s head of defined contribution (DC) Emma Douglas as chair of the new policy board .The three new members of the PLSA’s main board are: Alison Hatcher, global head of corporate sector at HSBC Global Asset Management; Patrick Heath-Lay, chief executive officer of B&CE, the provider for DC master trust The People’s Pension; and Catherine May, a corporate affairs specialist who has worked at several FTSE 100 companies.Seven people have stepped down from the board, including former chair of the PLSA Lesley Williams, National Grid pension chief Chris Hogg, and Royal Bank of Scotland’s pension scheme manager Carol Young. The main board now has eight members, down from 12. Emma Douglas, chair of the PLSA’s new policy boardHogg and Young have joined the newly established policy board alongside other former PLSA board members Nicola Mark, head of the Norfolk Pension Fund, and Jamie Jenkins, head of pensions strategy at Standard Life Aberdeen.The policy board includes representatives of pension providers, lawyers, asset managers, consultants and pension fund executives from both the public and private sectors.Emma Douglas highlighted the diversity of the appointments: “The make-up of the policy board not only reflects the breadth of the PLSA’s membership, but we also have a range of ages and backgrounds represented and over 50% are female, which unfortunately can still be rare within our industry.”The proposed membership – which will be confirmed following a vote at the PLSA’s annual general meeting next month – is as follows:center_img Julian Mund, chief executive of the PLSA, said: “The changes to our board are part of wider reforms we have been making to ensure we have the right governance for our association and are able to fulfil our mission of helping everyone achieve a better income in retirement.“Alison, Patrick and Catherine will bring a fantastic mix of skills to the table and I am excited to work with them to deliver our strategic goals in the years to come.”last_img read more

Vacant Gold Coast blocks listed with an eye-watering price tag

first_imgThe Paradise Waters blocks at 127-129 Commodore Drive are listed with a big asking price.TWO neighbouring blocks in a prestige Gold Coast enclave are on the market with a jaw-dropping price tag that is normally reserved for the most luxurious mega-mansions.The 1723sq m Paradise Waters site at 127-129 Commodore Drive is listed with a price guide between $7.8 million and $8.5 million.With 48m of main river frontage and direct access to the Broadwater, the large land parcel is in a prime position.It has wide water views that stretch across the river to The Southport School and could comfortably fit two large houses. MORE NEWS: Bizarre way TV star scored dream QLD home MORE NEWS: Buyers fighting for fewer housing options More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa8 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoThey last sold in 2017 for $3.5 million each.He said there was one prospective buyer, who previously owned land on the street, who was considering snapping up both.“They’re very familiar with the area and the value of that land in the area,” he said.“The extra value in the land is that it’s a double block and it’s rare to get a double block.”Property records show the owner paid $3.5 million each for the blocks in 2017.If it fetches its asking price, it will be the second highest sale recorded on the exclusive street.The record was set by the sprawling 3369sq m site at No. 126 when it sold for $9.4 million in October. Harcourts Coastal agent Mark Rustin, who is marketing the property with Skye Rustin, said the properties had a lot to offer.“First, it’s main river so that’s one big thing but also it’s the width of the block and the availability to cater for a large vessel and the fact that it’s Commodore Drive,” he said.They are being marketed as one property but Mr Rustin said the owner is considering selling them separately.“We’ve had a lot of interest in it, predominantly for either lot,” he said.“There’s not a lot of buyers that are out there for both lots.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59last_img read more

Brisbane home sells for $13m despite coronavirus concerns

first_img Palmer wants special pontoon permission This house at 14 Sutherland Ave, Ascot, has sold for more than $13m.Ray White New Farm principal Matt Lancashire, who negotiated the sale with his colleague Hamish Bowman, said the property sold to a local property developer with a young family.Mr Lancashire said the home attracted interest from interstate, as well as expat buyers in the UK, Hong Kong and Singapore, plus some Australia farmers.“The land size alone was very attractive because it’s more than an acre of land — one of the largest parcels in the area,” he said. The pool at the property at 14 Sutherland Ave, Ascot.“I have a database of every buyer who has ever inquired with me on any property worth more than $5 million, so I have a database of 1660 prestige buyers. There are some serious buyers looking.“We had serious buyers (for Windermere), but in fact the winning buyers weren’t actively looking. They were passive buyers, because they have a beautiful home already, but they wanted a statement home and they fell in love with it.” Mr Lancashire said he was also in the process of finalising another “market leading” sale. The former owners installed a new kitchen in the home at 14 Sutherland Ave, Ascot.While the auction market remained strong at the weekend, there are concerns this resilience may not last.There are reports that buyers are opting for virtual tours of homes through real estate agents via social media, and more sellers are getting cold feet about listing their properties. Mr Lancashire said he had been prepared for the worst at the weekend, but was surprised by how many buyers were out — undeterred by the circumstances. The house at 14 Sutherland Ave, Ascot, has beautiful wide verandas. Picture: Ray White.“We were deeply concerned going into Saturday,” he said. “We were nervous that we would see low turnouts at opens and auctions, but the opposite happened. “We had, in some cases, more than 40 groups through some open for inspections. So the message is that we are open for business and committed, determined buyers are still very active in this market.” One of the courtyards at the property has a fountain and a pizza oven. Picture: Ray White.According to CoreLogic data, auction markets remain strong despite coronavirus concerns, returning a preliminary clearance rate of 70.6 per cent across 2,220 homes up for sale by auction over the past week.The property research company’s weekend market update showed there was “some downside concern” that housing activity would reduce in the coming weeks as confidence was affected by the coronavirus.“However, based on the early auction results this week, the housing market has proven to be relatively resilient so far.”More from newsCOVID-19 renovation boom: How much Aussies are spending to give their houses a facelift during the pandemic3 days agoWhizzkid buys almost one property a month during COVID-197 days ago The previous sale price record for Ascot was set by this house at 27 Sutherland Ave. Picture supplied.The previous record for Ascot was set by Domino’s Pizza boss Don Meij when he sold 27 Sutherland Avenue for $11 million in 2018. Chris Miers, who paid $10.2 million for 14 Sutherland Avenue in 2014, said the sale of his home was a sign of confidence in the prestige market. The Miers are downsizing to live on the river at Teneriffe with a possible international move on the horizon. MORE: Cheapest mortgages in history for Aussie homeowners This house at 14 Sutherland Ave, Ascot, has sold for more than $13m. Image: CoreLogic.BIG money is still changing hands at the top end of Brisbane’s housing market despite concerns the rapidly spreading coronavirus might spook buyers and sellers.One of the city’s oldest and grandest estates has just sold for more than $13 million after less than three weeks on the market, setting a sale price record for the blue-chip suburb of Ascot.Built in 1886 Windermere on 14 Sutherland Avenue is a six-bedroom, four-bathroom heritage Queenslander on a 4660sqm parcel of land. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 The property features a championship-sized tennis court, pool and spa, and lush gardens landscaped by the designer Paul Bangay.The former owners gave the house a minor renovation, including installing a new kitchen.A guest wing in the home features a second kitchen and access to a wine cellar, sauna and media room.There are two courtyards — one with a pizza oven and fountain, and the other with a barbecue, shed and cubby house.Traditional features include wide verandas, 3.8m-high ceilings and marble fireplaces. FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK An aerial shot of the property at 14 Sutherland Ave, Ascot. Image: CoreLogic.last_img read more

COVID-19 lockdowns drive rural real estate boom

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:31Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:31 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenIs it a good time to list?02:31City buyers seeking to secure a safe haven in the event of further COVID-19 lockdowns are driving a ‘super boom’ in rural real estate. Inquiries on rural holdings in the southern Gold Coast hinterland and Tweed Shire have risen sharply as buyers act on plans for a pandemic-proof lifestyle.“There has been a super boom in rural property inquiries,” said Christie’s Prestige Director Alex Caraco.“We’ve had a 300 to 400 per cent rise during COVID-19 on vacant rural land in the Tallebudgera, Currumbin, Numinbah and Tweed valleys.” MORE: Queensland’s best house will have you walking on water Top 10 Gold Coast sales of 2020 There were 42 registered bidders for 3222 Kyogle Rd, Mount Burrell.Mr Caraco said several rural holdings which had been on the market for some time were now suddenly under contract. “Be it on a small scale or a large scale, people are moving quickly on rural properties,” he said. “When you look at rural listings on realestate.com.au, many are now under contract.” Just over the Queensland border in the NSW Northern Rivers pocket of Mount Burrell, a 259ha parcel at 3222 Kyogle Rd attracted huge interest at auction on June 19. A June auction saw 3222 Kyogle Rd, Mount Burrell sold for $2 million.Mr Caraco said those inquiries were coming from city buyers looking for a self-sustainable secondary residence to retreat to in the event of further lockdowns.“People’s thought process is as follows: ‘Why would I want to be locked up like people are unfortunately being locked up in Melbourne in a block of apartments,’” he said.“The inquiries we’re getting are from people who want to own a second property in the country where they can be self-sufficient should another lockdown occur. They can then move there as their principal place of residence, not be constrained, and grow their own organic food.”center_img More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa7 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoThe Mount Burrell enjoys high rainfall on the Tweed River.The original three-bedroom home is in poor condition, however the property boasts freshwater Tweed River frontage, high rainfall, dams, timber assets, grazing paddocks and subdivision potential – all within 63km to Gold Coast Airport and 73km to Byron Bay.“The property was expected to sell in the early one millions,” Mr Caraco said. “There were 42 registered bidders and the property sold for $2 million.” City buyers are showing strong interest in 63 Braeside Dr, Uki.First National Real Estate – Murwillumbah agent Paul Stobbie said his office had received a spike in inquiries for rural properties since the COVID-19 pandemic began. He said Gold Coast, Sydney and Melbourne buyers wanted country ‘getaways’ for $700,000 to $900,000.“They want to get away from people, grow their own veggies and be self-sustainable,” he said. “I think everyone is planning for the end of the world now.”He said a sprawling 20 acre property surrounded by mountains at 63 Braeside Dr, Uki near Mount Warning, 30 minutes from the Gold Coast, was attracting huge interest at $639,000. Palm Springs-inspired house has laid-back resort vibelast_img read more

2017 Batesville CYO Deanery Tournament

first_imgThe pairings for The 2017 Batesville CYO Deanery Tournament have been released.The Opening Round games will be taking place on Sunday, January 29th at The St. Louis Parish Gymnasium.  The Quarterfinal games will be at St. Louis and St. Michael’s in Brookville on Sunday, February 5th.  The Semi-Final games will be at St. Louis on Sunday, February 12th.  The Championship game will be at St. Louis on Sunday, February 19th.2017 Batesville Area CYO Deanery TourneyCourtesy of St. Louis Coach Roger Dietz.last_img read more

Georgann M Flory

first_imgGeorgann M. Flory, 88, Greensburg, passed away on Monday, October 28, 2019 at Heritage House Nursing Home in Greensburg.Born, October 3, 1931 in Batesville, Indiana, she was the daughter of George and Cora (Engel) Bloemer.Georgann retired from social services as a social worker at Heritage House in Greensburg. She was a 1949 graduate of Batesville High School. She was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church.She was married to Robert Lee “Red” Flory on May 1, 1954 and he preceded her in death on April 2, 2009.She is survived by one son, Michael D. Flory, Greensburg; one daughter, Raynel (John) Wilson, Fisher; one sister, Alma L. Miller, Batesville; four grandchildren, Katie Flory, Meagan Flory, Alyssa Flory, Andrew Kinney.She was preceded in death by her parents, husband; one brother, Raymond A. Bloemer; one sister, Rosemary Stehlin.Family and friends will gather at 12:30 p.m. on Sunday at the funeral home to pray the rosary. Visitation will follow until 4:00 p.m. at Porter-Oliger-Pearson Funeral Home in Greensburg. The family will also receive friends from 10:30 a.m. until the funeral mass at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, November 4, 2019 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Greensburg with Rev. John Meyer officiating.Interment will be held at St. Louis Catholic Cemetery in Batesville.Memorials may be made to Our Hospice.Online condolences can be made to the family at www.popfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

PBC Plans Arbitrary Phase Two Reopening

first_imgWEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — One after the other, people let Palm Beach County Commissioners know what they think of the county’s COVID-19 response.“If wearing a mask is to help from getting sick and I’m not wearing a mask then where is the danger?” one man said.And plans to pursue Phase Two reopening.“I believe that move should be slow, calculated, and based on the successes off of other areas that have flattened their curve,” Nina Boynton said.In a 4-to-2 vote, commissioners agreed to send a letter to Governor DeSantis requesting to make the move in five steps.Step one is to reopen certain indoor entertainment venues like bowling alleys and movie theaters with restrictions.Step two involves a recommendation to the Palm Beach County School District to open 3 to 4 weeks after the county moves to Phase Two.Right now, the school district plans to open one week after the county enters Phase Two.County Administrator Verdenia Baker said the commission’s recommendation will give more time to address any potential issues.“We believe that this plan and starting it off this way is probably more beneficial to the community,” she said.After a lengthy discussion and input, Commissioner Hal Valeche said he can’t support the plan.“I really don’t see why we need to be giving recommendations and advice to the school board. We have enough of our own problems,” he said.As for steps three through five, the third increment would allow for additional venues like comedy clubs and auditoriums to reopen down the road. That’s before step four and the eventual easing of restrictions on places like skating centers and escape rooms.As for the final step, reopening businesses like bars and night clubs that would need the governor’s authorization.According to the county, facial coverings will still be required in Phase Two, as well as social distancing.last_img read more

Cricket News Virat Kohli’s Indian cricket aim to avoid collapse syndrome in Australia Tests

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: Virat Kohli’s Indian cricket team is determined to rewrite history. After failing in South Africa and England, India will be aiming to achieve what no other team before them has. Success in the Test series against Australia in their own conditions will help the side overcome their overseas pains in a big way. The losses in England (thrice), South Africa (twice) and New Zealand (once) will all be blown away if the side achieves success in Australia. However, for that to materialise, Kohli’s side will not only have to battle the baggage of history but they will have to overcome their perennial problem which has haunted them on overseas tours.Read More |Nathan McCullum declared dead, former player says he is ‘alive’When it comes to Tests in countries like South Africa, England and Australia, India have suffered batting collapses which have changed the course of the series. Some collapses came when the team was on the threshold of a win. In the previous cycle of 2013-15, this factor was the prime problem for India. In 2018, with two defeats overseas, it seems the lessons have not been learnt. Before Kohli departed for Australia, his pre-tour press conference summed up what the problem for the team was. “When we made the mistakes, it was extreme. We played good cricket, but the mistakes were extreme. We need to control a tough situation better and how to find a way out of it rather than getting out of it immediately,” Kohli said.Read More |Virat Kohli enjoys batting if someone has a go at him: Tim PaineThe extreme mistakes were the batting collapses. The fact that it has happened consistently is a worrying sign for Kohli and he needs to avoid a repeat of past instances when a collapse resulted in a loss for the side. Down Under DramaKohli need not go very far to understand how batting collapses have cost India. In the 2014/15 series, India held the upper hand in Adelaide. The skipper had scored centuries in both the innings and India was poised for a famous win. Chasing 364 for a win, India were comfortably placed at 242/2 and Kohli was given good company by Murali Vijay on 99. However, when Vijay fell LBW to Nathan Lyon, a collapse began and India lost eight wickets for 73 runs. Lyon ended up with 7/152 and Kohli was out for 141 as India lost the Test by 48 runs.Read More |Kohli focused only on cricket, not on confrontations vs AustraliaThe pain was repeated in Brisbane. In the first innings, India lost six wickets for 87 runs as they failed to ride on Vijay’s ton. In the second innings, India started off well at 71/1 but a devastating collapse of five wickets for 16 runs ensured that the match went in Australia’s favour. These instances of losing wickets in a bunch have not only hurt India in Australia, but the nightmare has been repeated even in South Africa and England. 2018 House of CardsIn the first Test in Cape Town, India threw away the advantage when they lost seven wickets for 92 runs in the first innings. In the second innings, while chasing 208, India suffered two collapses. They lost three wickets for nine runs and four wickets for 11 runs as they lost the match by 72 runs. In the Centurion Test, they lost seven wickets for 87 runs while chasing 287 to lose the match and the series. The trend of collapses continued in England. In Edgbaston, a collapse of five wickets for 78 runs proved disastrous for India in their 31-run loss. In Lord’s, they were bowled out for 107 and 130. In Southampton, they lost four wickets for 16 runs in the first innings while in the second innings, they lost six wickets for 40 runs. India lost the series 4-1 after another collapse of five wickets for 20 at The Oval.In each instance, the fact that India lost wickets in heaps was the key factor behind their losses. For Kohli to gain success in Australia, a repeat of the collapses must be avoided at all costs. last_img read more