Djokovic fined $10,000 for ‘unsportsmanlike conduct’

first_imgRelatedPosts Djokovic clinches fifth Italian Open title Djokovic zooms to 10th Italian Open final Live stream Premier League, La Liga, Serie A on Showmax Pro this weekend Novak Djokovic’s has been fined an additional $10,000 (£7,600) for “unsportsmanlike behaviour” following his dramatic disqualification from the US Open on Sunday night.Djokovic, who has already been stripped of his $250,000 (£190,000) in prize money for reaching the last-16, was given a further punishment by tournament organisers for his actions on court against Spaniard Pablo Carreno Busta. He could yet face a further fine for his decision to skip media duties following his default.The world No 1 was broken for 5-6 in the opening set and petulantly swiped a ball away that struck a female line judge, Laura Clark, in the throat.Djokovic pleaded his case for leniency to tournament officials but referee Soeren Friemel, who was summoned onto court inside the deserted Arthur Ashe Stadium by umpire Aurelie Tourte, told Djokovic, after plenty of debate, that there was no option but to disqualify him.After Djokovic left the Flushing Meadows facility and refused to take part in his press commitments, the United States Tennis Association released a statement on his default.“In accordance with the Grand Slam rulebook, following his actions of intentionally hitting a ball dangerously or recklessly within the court or hitting a ball with negligent disregard of the consequences, the US Open tournament referee defaulted Novak Djokovic from the 2020 US Open,” it began. “Because he was defaulted, Djokovic will lose all ranking points earned at the US Open and will be fined the prize money won at the tournament in addition to any or all fines levied with respect to the offending incident.”Djokovic eventually went on to address the matter himself with a statement on his social media.He wrote: “This whole situation has left me really sad and empty. I checked on the lines person and the tournament told me that thank God she is feeling ok.“I’m extremely sorry to have caused her such stress. So unintended. So wrong. I’m not disclosing her name to respect her privacy. As for the disqualification, I need to go back within and work on my disappointment and turn this all into a lesson for my growth and evolution as a player and human being.“I apologise to the US Open tournament and everyone associated for my behaviour. I’m very grateful to my team and family for being my rock support, and my fans for always being there with me. Thank you and I’m so sorry.” Tags: Disciplinary ActionFineNovak DjokovicUS Openlast_img read more

How a senior-year club switch allowed SJ Quigley became a ‘complete’ field hockey player

first_imgTwelve balls formed a large circle behind the end line and SJ Quigley kicked one toward the penalty corner insertion hash. It was Oct. 12, less than an hour before Syracuse faced No. 1 North Carolina, and rain poured onto J.S. Coyne Stadium.Quigley paced back three steps. Her Syracuse rain jacket crinkled as she shrugged her shoulders and leaned back. Tess Queen waited at the top of the shooting circle, her stick flat on the ground. Quigley moved forward into her insertion rhythm — first step, second step, drop stick, third step, sweep — and sent the ball toward Queen, who stopped it as Claire Cooke knocked the ball into the cage.This was her new specialization, perfected through hundreds of pre-practice reps and game action, her new role in field hockey’s vital set piece.Two years ago, Quigley hadn’t ever inserted a ball.She wasn’t a “complete” field hockey player then, her club team head coach Brian Hope said. A switch to Hope’s program — X-Calibur — from Quigley’s former team WC Eagles, during her senior year of high school was unusual but necessary. The WC Eagles’ rigid, regimented program focused on sound technique, but Quigley was burnt out, Hope said. After switching, she no longer prioritized only skills, instead focusing on creativity and freedom on the pitch, which allowed Quigley to eventually pick up the insertion role at SU.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It was a skill that the team needed somebody to be,” SU assistant coach Katie Gerzabek said, “And I think that she really grabbed onto that role on the corner to master it.”She’s gravitated from a non-factor to staple on Syracuse’s penalty corners this season, inserting 52 of the Orange’s 59 corners this season. As No. 14 Syracuse (8-4, 1-2 Atlantic Coast) aims for a return to the NCAA tournament after missing it last year, Quigley’s penalty corner role has made her indispensable.Before Quigley inherited that position from Carolin Hoffmann this season, she faced her mother, Josie, at their kitchen island in Villanova, Pennsylvania two years ago, and pleaded for help. The choice to switch club teams before her senior year of high school had clogged Quigley’s mind for months.Field hockey was her primary sport since she was 10 years old. Even before then, Josie inched her daughter toward the sport she played in college. Quigley started using her mother’s field hockey stick even before elementary school — “Put this in your hand, try my stick,” her mother would say.The pair hit balls into a lacrosse net in their backyard after school, fine-tuning the sport’s basics. Josie said that the easiest way to progress in field hockey is always about playing free and loving the game. Mind clogs lead to stumbles and choppy ball movement.“That’s what you have to do, just play. Don’t overthink what you’re doing,” Josie said.Quigley was taught the details of a deceptive sweep and the motions for a powerful reverse hit, but her time with WC was “mentally draining,” Adele Williams, Quigley’s high school coach, said.In games, she’d receive the ball, then hesitate. She’d double-pump when a passing lane opened and turn the ball over. She had the talent — she committed to SU as a sophomore — but lacked trust in herself.“She realized that she was overthinking,” Josie said. “Every time she got on the field, she wanted to be more relaxed in the decision-making.”Quigley and Josie went to a workout with Hope, who not only offered an immediate, spot but also preached freedom on the field. Quigley could use the techniques taught by WC, or experiment with her own, Hope said. After thinking the decision over for months, Quigley joined late in the summer of her senior year.“The biggest thing was just giving her permission to play and not worry about making mistakes,” Hope said.That decision came full-circle during the 2017 National Indoor Tournament at the Richmond Convention Center. Quigley, lined up at right back, intercepted a pass in the first minute of her first matchup against WC after switching, and took off down the sideline. She weaved through a first defender. Then, a second.Eva Suppa | Digital Design EditorQuigley lifted a shot past the WC goalie and into the cage. She immediately sprinted toward the sideline and embraced Hope, while Josie smiled in the stands. “Maybe this was the right thing to do,” she thought.Two years later, Quigley has become the two-way player Syracuse has always needed her to be. She’s combined the skills she learned at WC with the freedom Hope helped instill in her while providing versatility to SU. As Quigley raced down the right sideline early in the third quarter during a Sept. 22 game against Colgate, she received a pass from Cooke in stride.Quigley closed in on Colgate goalie Anna Unger, bent her knees and elevated a shot into the cage for her first goal since the season-opener against Vermont. Two frames earlier, Quigley aligned the ball at the Raiders’ penalty corner insertion hash and paced three steps back.In 2019, Quigley has started all 12 games, surpassing her six from 2018 and has helped fill gaping holes in Syracuse’s defense by switching to the backline from forward. In that time, she also picked up inserting penalty corners — an aspect she had never been a part of before SU. Her first attempts flew over defender’s sticks or sailed wide of awaiting stoppers, Gerzabek said. That couldn’t happen in games.“I was not very good at it,” Quigley said.Quigley spends her pre-practice time on the new specialization. It took nine years to uncover, yet only months to master the movements — first step, second step, drop stick, third step, sweep.That routine has helped her repeat it with extreme precision. Balls need to roll onto Queen’s fast enough for a shot before the defense closes in, but smooth enough to avoid a misplay. She’s led a penalty corner unit that has converted on 17.3% of its attempts.Already leading 1-0 at Colgate on Sept. 22, Quigley executed her even strides and swept the ball toward Laura Graziosi. The primary pass began a set that evaded the Raider defense and ended with a Charlotte de Vries goal, bouncing off defenders and sticks in the process. Quigley thrust her arms in the air and sprinted toward the Orange huddle. This was what she had worked for.“Having many skill sets in your back pocket so you can be the person that the coach can go to always makes you a valuable player,” Josie said. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 13, 2019 at 11:12 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrewlast_img read more

NBA trade rumors: Clippers have yet to make offer for Pelicans star Anthony Davis

first_imgThe Clippers are not involved in the Anthony Davis sweepstakes. At least, not yet.Los Angeles has not made an offer for the 25-year-old Pelicans star, according to a report from the Los Angeles Times, which cites unidentified league sources. The five-time All-Star’s top choice would be a move to the Lakers, according to ESPN. He has missed the Pelicans’ last seven games with a finger injury. Davis is averaging 29.3 points and 13.3 rebounds per game this season.The Clippers entered play Monday in the eighth spot in the Western Conference standings with a 29-25 record. Related News NBA trade rumors: Lakers, Pelicans reportedly moving closer to Anthony Davis dealcenter_img NBA trade rumors: Pelicans don’t want to deal Jrue Holiday Davis reportedly informed New Orleans this week he’d be willing to sign a long-term extension with the Clippers. But, the Clippers desire to pursue him in a trade remains unclear, according to the Times’ report.Davis will not sign an extension with New Orleans and wants to be traded, agent Rich Paul told ESPN in late January. The Lakers are reportedly “determined” to acquire Davis and have been involved in serious trade talks with the Pelicans.last_img read more