Four more boys come forward after Depok orphanage sexual abuse case reopened

first_imgFor the current investigation, the four boys were accompanied by Darius, who is the founder of the orphanage where the four, along with 40 others, lived, Tulus said, adding that he had made the police report in his capacity as the guardian of the children.The four boys that have provided their statements to the police are currently under the protection of the Social Affairs Ministry’s children rehabilitation center in Jakarta. The ministry provided a trauma healing program for them. During the initial investigation, none of the boys received such service from the state.To keep the four children in a safe place, far from the orphanage, is important to protect them from any unwanted interventions that might influence them to change their mind later, as happened to their peers last year, KPAI commissioner Putu Elvina, who is in charge of the case, says.Last year the police failed to complete the dossiers for the prosecutors’ office to bring the case to court because they claimed they could not find the whereabouts of the three boys who first made a report against Angelo. By the time the police found the boys, they made a statement to retract their report. (JP/Hengky Wijaya)“Working together with child protection officers from related institutions as well as the children’s lawyer, we continuously encouraged them [the four boys] to be courageous in telling their stories,” Putu told the Post in a recent interview.A joint effort led by the KPAI is also looking into the possibility of human trafficking in the case due to reports of Angelo’s method of recruiting boys who joined his orphanage. Most of the boys in the orphanage are not really orphans, but rather children from poor families in North Sumatra, Maluku and East Nusa Tenggara. Some of the boys told The Jakarta Post and Tirto.id that Angelo or his partners promised a scholarship to pursue a better education in Depok.“We believe that he [Angelo] does not work alone,” said Putu.While the legal process against Angelo is ongoing, the KPAI is assessing the condition of the rest of the boys who formerly lived at Angelo’s Kencana Bejana Rohani orphanage, and who currently live under the care of Darius Rebong. Returning the children to their parents or transfering them to other orphanages that are considered more established and professional are the feasible options on the table for the time being.At the same time, the state-sponsored Witness and Victim Protection Agency (LPSK) is also reaching out to children who may have been Angelo’s victims as well as other individuals who might know about their stories in order to make sure that the legal process against Angelo actually proceeds.The LPSK has received a request for protection from Farid, the first person who reported the case to the police. “We have been in contact with Darius, the current guardian of the children,” LPSK commissioner Edwin Partogi Pasaribu said.Topics : The police have recorded new statements against Angelo from four boys, who are now under the care of Darius Rebong, the founder and head of a new orphanage, also in Depok. One of the boys had gone through a physical examination, said Depok Police investigator Second Insp. Tulus Handani.“The process is still in its early stages,” Tulus said. “What we must do from now on is to protect the children in a safe place so that they can provide further statements when needed in order to ensure the legal process runs smoothly, unlike the previous one.”Last year, the police failed to complete the dossiers for the prosecutors’ office to bring the case to court because they claimed they could not find the whereabouts of the three boys who first made a report against Angelo. By the time the police found the boys, they made a statement to retract their report. By law, the police should have continued the case regardless of the victims’ retraction, but they did not pursue more statements for the dossiers, resulting in a rejected dossier by the prosecutors.The boys at that time did not receive any legal or psychological assistance from anyone. Even the Indonesian Child Protection Commission (KPAI) left the legal process to a bystander in the case, an orphanage forum leader in Bogor, Farid Ari Fandi. After three months, the investigation crumbled and Angelo walked free in December last year. He soon established a new orphanage and lived among boys again in Depok. Four more victims and witnesses have come forward and made a report after the Depok Police in West Java reopened a year-old investigation into a case of sexual abuse of orphanage boys, allegedly committed by their sole guardian, a Catholic brother.The investigation was restarted following the publication of stories by The Jakarta Post and Tirto.id that shed light on the failure of the state and the Catholic Church to give the victims justice. The suspect in the case, Lukas Lucky Ngalngola, or Brother Angelo as he styled himself, is a member of a Philippines-based Catholic congregation, the Blessed Sacrament Missionaries of Charity (BSMC), and founded an all-boys orphanage called Kencana Bejana Rohani.The boys from the orphanage called Angelo kelelawar malam (night bat), since he would allegedly carry out his acts after midnight, putting on all black attire. The boys claimed Angelo drugged his victims.last_img read more

Family of Ex-FBI Agent, Coral Springs Resident Bob Levinson Says He Died in Iranian Custody

first_imgMeanwhile, Iran’s government has never acknowledged arresting Levinson, who worked as a private investigator at the time of his disappearance.In 2016, four American hostages were freed from Iranian captivity in connection with money the Obama Administration sent to Iran as a weapons payment reimbursement.However, Levinson was not on that plane.Last November, Iranian officials sent a message to the United Nations, referring to Levinson’s case as “ongoing.”That occurred shortly after the U.S. government raised the reward for information leading to Levinson’s safe return to $25 million.Renewed Hope for Broward Family of FBI Agent Bob Levinson Held in Iran The family of Robert Levinson, an ex-FBI agent and Coral Springs resident who had been held captive in Iran for 13 years, says he has died in Iranian custody.Levinson’s family posted their statement on Twitter, adding that they recently received information from U.S. officials that has led them and the family to believe he passed away before the coronavirus pandemic.“It is impossible to describe our pain,” the statement reads. “Our family will spend the rest of our lives without the most amazing manwe have ever known, a new reality that is inconceivable to us. His grandchildren will never meet him. They will only know him through the stories we tell them.”Levinson was the longest held U.S. hostage in history.He was reportedly captured in the Iranian island of Kish in 2007.The family later admitted that he had been working for the CIA.last_img read more

Unsportsmanlike Conduct: The exploitation of Black athletes – Part II

first_imgOnly 1 percent of contractors of Levi’s Stadium in California are people of color.Pros go from rags-to-riches-back-to-ragsSECOND OF A 3-PART SERIESEditors Note: As a sports agent, Attorney Everett Glenn has negotiated contracts for some of the biggest names in sports, including NFL Hall of Famers Jerry Rice, Richard Dent and Reggie White as well as 11 first round draft picks. He has also had a front-row seat observing how Black athletes and the Black community are exploited, enriching others while leaving the community and, ultimately, the athletes themselves destitute. Sports is a $500 billion per year industry, but few of those dollars return to the African-American community. According to Sports Illustrated, by the time former NFL players have been retired for two years, nearly 80 percent of them “have gone bankrupt or are under financial stress because of joblessness or divorce.” Within five years of retirement, approximately 60 percent of former NBA players are broke. After more than three decades of looking at this tragedy on the collegiate and professional level, Attorney Glenn pulls back the cover on these practices in a 3-part series for the NNPA News Service and, more importantly, outlines what can be done to halt the wholesale exploitation and initiate economic reciprocity.DeMaurice Smith, executive director of NFL Players Association (L), and Everett L. Glenn.WASHINGTON (NNPA) – There have been so many former professional athletes in the news recently who have gone from rags-to-riches-back-to-rags again that they could form their own reality show.Future Hall of Famer Terrell Owens, for example, accumulated some amazing stats during his 15-year NFL career as a wide receiver: second in league history with 15,934 yards, tied for second with 153 touchdowns and sixth with 1,078 catches.Instead of talking about his on-field accomplishments, however, fans and sportscasters are talking about his interview with Dr. Phil in which he disclosed that he has lost all of his money, estimated to be between $80 million and $100 million.After falling behind in child support payments to baby mama Kimberly Floyd, a judge ordered T.O. to complete eight hours of community service, which he performed at a Los Angeles Goodwill store.And there was former NBA baller Allen Iverson, who says he’s broke after earning more than $150 million during his 15-year NBA career, plus a Reebok endorsement worth $50 million . At his divorce proceedings last year, Iverson shouted to his estranged wife, Tawanna, “I don’t even have money for a cheeseburger.”Hundreds of other former professional athletes – including former Boston Celtic Antoine Walker, boxer Mike Tyson and track star Marion Jones – could be added to the list. And no matter how often their stories are told, we’re likely to see still more stories of personal and financial ruin.Let’s be clear: athletes who spend lavishly and regularly travel with as many as 50 freeloaders must accept direct responsibility for their current predicament. But they are not the only ones at fault in a system that routinely separates Black athletes from their community while they are still enrolled in college, steering them away from wives who look like them and White agents who don’t share their culture.What separates the exploitation of the Black athlete at the professional level, where Black athletes make up roughly 80 percent of the NBA and 70 percent of the NFL, is money. Big, big money. And big money in the hands of unsophisticated Black athletes is a train wreck waiting to happen, attracting agents, financial advisers and other professionals who view them as easy prey.In the typical scenario, a “qualified” agent lands a client and then quickly recommends a financial adviser. Or, vice versa. Maybe the pair recruits together. Maybe they just vouch for “their guy.” Maybe there are kickbacks. Maybe there is the expectation of future swaps.  However it goes down, in the end, a player thinks he has two sets of independent, trustworthy eyes on his money when, in fact, he has none.How is it that well-paid agents and advisers are absolved of any responsibility and/or liability for their complicity in players’ financial fatalities? We read about Iverson’s financial problems with no mention of his agent, Leon Rose of CAA. We know about Terrell Owens’ money worries but Drew Rosenhaus, his “super agent,” isn’t held accountable. If you check the websites of major agents, they all in one form or another claim a “family-first” approach. The only family they put first is theirs.The same media that ignores their colossal failures had no problem demonizing Don King. He single-handedly changed the economics of the fight game with such promotions as the “Rumble in the Jungle” and the “Thrilla in Manila,” yet White-owned corporate media have portrayed King as an unrepentant villain. But they don’t make similar claims about his chief rival, Bob Arum, whom promoter Dana White accused of “sucking the life out of the sport (boxing).”Because coaches and university boosters, most of whom are White, steer Black athletes to White agents, many Black agents – such as Angelo Wright, Al Irby, Alvin Keels, Kennard McGuire and Tony Paige – don’t get a fair opportunity to represent most Black athletes. My guess is that Black player agents represent less than 15 percent of all NBA and NFL players.According to Sports Illustrated, by the time former NFL players have been retired for two years, nearly 80 percent of them “have gone bankrupt or are under financial stress because of joblessness or divorce.” Within five years of retirement, approximately 60 percent of former NBA players are broke. By virtue of their numbers, it’s clear that Black agents are not leading a parade of Black athletes into bankruptcy or financial distress nor are they sitting by silently watching their clients commit financial suicide.last_img read more