How a senior-year club switch allowed SJ Quigley became a ‘complete’ field hockey player

first_imgTwelve balls formed a large circle behind the end line and SJ Quigley kicked one toward the penalty corner insertion hash. It was Oct. 12, less than an hour before Syracuse faced No. 1 North Carolina, and rain poured onto J.S. Coyne Stadium.Quigley paced back three steps. Her Syracuse rain jacket crinkled as she shrugged her shoulders and leaned back. Tess Queen waited at the top of the shooting circle, her stick flat on the ground. Quigley moved forward into her insertion rhythm — first step, second step, drop stick, third step, sweep — and sent the ball toward Queen, who stopped it as Claire Cooke knocked the ball into the cage.This was her new specialization, perfected through hundreds of pre-practice reps and game action, her new role in field hockey’s vital set piece.Two years ago, Quigley hadn’t ever inserted a ball.She wasn’t a “complete” field hockey player then, her club team head coach Brian Hope said. A switch to Hope’s program — X-Calibur — from Quigley’s former team WC Eagles, during her senior year of high school was unusual but necessary. The WC Eagles’ rigid, regimented program focused on sound technique, but Quigley was burnt out, Hope said. After switching, she no longer prioritized only skills, instead focusing on creativity and freedom on the pitch, which allowed Quigley to eventually pick up the insertion role at SU.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It was a skill that the team needed somebody to be,” SU assistant coach Katie Gerzabek said, “And I think that she really grabbed onto that role on the corner to master it.”She’s gravitated from a non-factor to staple on Syracuse’s penalty corners this season, inserting 52 of the Orange’s 59 corners this season. As No. 14 Syracuse (8-4, 1-2 Atlantic Coast) aims for a return to the NCAA tournament after missing it last year, Quigley’s penalty corner role has made her indispensable.Before Quigley inherited that position from Carolin Hoffmann this season, she faced her mother, Josie, at their kitchen island in Villanova, Pennsylvania two years ago, and pleaded for help. The choice to switch club teams before her senior year of high school had clogged Quigley’s mind for months.Field hockey was her primary sport since she was 10 years old. Even before then, Josie inched her daughter toward the sport she played in college. Quigley started using her mother’s field hockey stick even before elementary school — “Put this in your hand, try my stick,” her mother would say.The pair hit balls into a lacrosse net in their backyard after school, fine-tuning the sport’s basics. Josie said that the easiest way to progress in field hockey is always about playing free and loving the game. Mind clogs lead to stumbles and choppy ball movement.“That’s what you have to do, just play. Don’t overthink what you’re doing,” Josie said.Quigley was taught the details of a deceptive sweep and the motions for a powerful reverse hit, but her time with WC was “mentally draining,” Adele Williams, Quigley’s high school coach, said.In games, she’d receive the ball, then hesitate. She’d double-pump when a passing lane opened and turn the ball over. She had the talent — she committed to SU as a sophomore — but lacked trust in herself.“She realized that she was overthinking,” Josie said. “Every time she got on the field, she wanted to be more relaxed in the decision-making.”Quigley and Josie went to a workout with Hope, who not only offered an immediate, spot but also preached freedom on the field. Quigley could use the techniques taught by WC, or experiment with her own, Hope said. After thinking the decision over for months, Quigley joined late in the summer of her senior year.“The biggest thing was just giving her permission to play and not worry about making mistakes,” Hope said.That decision came full-circle during the 2017 National Indoor Tournament at the Richmond Convention Center. Quigley, lined up at right back, intercepted a pass in the first minute of her first matchup against WC after switching, and took off down the sideline. She weaved through a first defender. Then, a second.Eva Suppa | Digital Design EditorQuigley lifted a shot past the WC goalie and into the cage. She immediately sprinted toward the sideline and embraced Hope, while Josie smiled in the stands. “Maybe this was the right thing to do,” she thought.Two years later, Quigley has become the two-way player Syracuse has always needed her to be. She’s combined the skills she learned at WC with the freedom Hope helped instill in her while providing versatility to SU. As Quigley raced down the right sideline early in the third quarter during a Sept. 22 game against Colgate, she received a pass from Cooke in stride.Quigley closed in on Colgate goalie Anna Unger, bent her knees and elevated a shot into the cage for her first goal since the season-opener against Vermont. Two frames earlier, Quigley aligned the ball at the Raiders’ penalty corner insertion hash and paced three steps back.In 2019, Quigley has started all 12 games, surpassing her six from 2018 and has helped fill gaping holes in Syracuse’s defense by switching to the backline from forward. In that time, she also picked up inserting penalty corners — an aspect she had never been a part of before SU. Her first attempts flew over defender’s sticks or sailed wide of awaiting stoppers, Gerzabek said. That couldn’t happen in games.“I was not very good at it,” Quigley said.Quigley spends her pre-practice time on the new specialization. It took nine years to uncover, yet only months to master the movements — first step, second step, drop stick, third step, sweep.That routine has helped her repeat it with extreme precision. Balls need to roll onto Queen’s fast enough for a shot before the defense closes in, but smooth enough to avoid a misplay. She’s led a penalty corner unit that has converted on 17.3% of its attempts.Already leading 1-0 at Colgate on Sept. 22, Quigley executed her even strides and swept the ball toward Laura Graziosi. The primary pass began a set that evaded the Raider defense and ended with a Charlotte de Vries goal, bouncing off defenders and sticks in the process. Quigley thrust her arms in the air and sprinted toward the Orange huddle. This was what she had worked for.“Having many skill sets in your back pocket so you can be the person that the coach can go to always makes you a valuable player,” Josie said. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 13, 2019 at 11:12 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrewlast_img read more

21Bet ‘absolutely delighted’ with Gloucester partnership

first_img StumbleUpon Share Related Articles Submit 21Bet upgrades to Digitain sportsbook ahead of World Cup June 15, 2018 More bets wagered on Six Nations as England tipped for success February 22, 2019 Share Ladbrokes boosts Irish profile by announcing new Ambassador club September 10, 2019 Having extended their venture into the world of sports sponsorship by becoming the official betting partner of Gloucester Rugby, 21Bet CEO, Richard Hogg told SBC, ‘we’re absolutely delighted with the partnership’.A cornerstone of the sponsorship is the temporary renaming of the West Terrace to the ‘21Bet Terrace.’Hogg a committed rugby fan further stated: “They are steeped in history and have the most iconic Rugby stand there is in The Shed and so to have the extent of exposure that we have in the newly renamed ‘21Bet Terrace’ is considered a real coup.”“What also impressed us was just how forward thinking they are with a lot of technical advancements and initiatives upcoming”.21Bet are also offering a price boost on Gloucester finishing in the top 6 this season, Hogg said: “We’re 100% behind the team and think that they will go from strength to strength under new coach Johan Ackerman.“The better the club fare, the more exposure we are likely to get and so it’s a win-win situation. Nothing will please us more than to be paying out the Gloucester fans at the end of the season. 7/1 to finish in the top 6 represents huge value”, Hogg added.last_img read more

Home crunch triggers FTSE bookmakers’ Australian arms race

first_img FTSE bookmaker William Hill Plc has lit-up the Australian gambling market, by confirming that it has entered ‘in-depth discussions’ with Crown Resorts to acquire its controlling 62% stake in online betting subsidiary Crownbet.The cumbersome merger of Tabcorp-Tatts has dominated the Australian betting industry’s agenda and context in 2017, however, seeking to expand its international assets William Hill may have moved to trigger an ‘Australian arms race’, as FTSE betting giants are pressured to deliver international growth.Closing on Friday, UK news sources revealed that FTSE competitor Paddy Power Betfair (PPB), was also in discussion with James Packer’s Crown Resorts with regards to acquiring Crownbet, an asset deemed ‘non-core’ by Packer who has chosen to focus on Crown Resort’s new Australian casino developments.Moving forward, PPB governance desires to support its ‘fast-growth’ Sportsbet Australia division, which reported a 29% revenue uplift during Q3 2017, becoming Australia’s leading online wagering destination.Outgoing PPB Chief Executive Breon Corcoran has labelled Sportsbet Australia, as the betting group’s ‘shining star’ for international development and growth a key corporate objective for inbound PPB leader Peter Jackson (former WorldPay CEO).Facing tougher UK home market prospects, with significant incoming regulatory change, stricter advertising standards/practices, increasing costs, and all-around domestic GDP and Sterling forecasts downgraded (Brexit impacts). FTSE betting governances are being pressured by investors to deliver true international enterprises, making Plc bookmakers less reliant on home comforts.Ladbrokes Coral which is currently ‘reviewing all strategic options’ with regards to its corporate future, has fresh eyes on the Australian betting market, having appointed Jason Scott as new Ladbrokes Australia CEO this August.The lucrative Australian betting market, will not only become a ‘FTSE bookmaker playground’. As last week, the governance of Stockholm-listed European online gambling firm Kindred Group Plc revealed that it would significantly increase its marketing spend and coverage within Australia.Henrik Tjarnstrom, Kindred Group CEO stated that his company would now seek to expand its Australian digital services, as the established multi-market operator aims to enhance group revenue channels by creating lucrative assets ’beyond Europe’.Though Tabcorp governance, may have finally gained the ACT merger approval to combine its enterprise with Tatts, Australian analysts’ are all in agreement that the legacy operator faces its biggest threat from digitally shrewd and well-funded European players.Nevertheless, although Australia may appear a golden destination for FTSE players, industry stakeholders have been warned that regulatory concerns are growing with regards to betting exposure, much like home these concerns have become a political point of contention and conflict.The increased international attention is welcomed by industry investors and analysts seeking new ground. However, as market activity heats up, it is unlikely that all European players will survive the rugged and brutal reality of Australia’s betting terrain. Björn Nilsson: How Triggy is delivering digestible data through pre-set triggers August 28, 2020 Flutter moves to refine merger benefits against 2020 trading realities August 27, 2020 Submit StumbleUpon Share Share Related Articles GVC absorbs retail shocks as business recalibrates for critical H2 trading August 13, 2020last_img read more

Iowa COVID deaths hit new one-day high, schools get $71M in federal relief

first_imgJOHNSTON — Iowa has passed the 10,000 mark in total confirmed COVID-19 cases.Governor Reynolds made the announcement at her news conference earlier today, saying there were 408 new cases to give Iowa now a total of 10,111.Iowa has also surpassed the 200 death mark. 19 more deaths have been reported for a total now of 207. “We know that the virus causes the most serious illness for older adults and those with underlying conditions. Iowa’s deaths are consistently among this most vulnerable population. 56% of the deaths are residents of long-term care facilities, and despite the many proactive steps taken early on to protect our most vulnerable Iowans, preventing COVID-19 from impacting long-term care facilities is extremely challenging.”)Reynolds continued to emphasize the expansion of testing in the state, which she says will enable the state to begin to phase in businesses and activities that were put on hold while mitigating the spread of the virus. “Testing more Iowans provides us more information about the virus activity across the state, and it allows us to respond in a very targeted way to contain and manage the virus, especially in areas where activity is increasing or is already high. As General Correll says, ‘we’re fishing where the fish are’, so it’s no wonder that our daily case counts have grown over the last few weeks.Reynolds says it’s also important that Iowans don’t totally focus on the number of positive cases, but also the hospital capacity and the ability to take care of Iowans who may need hospitalization. “The fact is that we can’t prevent people from getting the COVID-19 virus. If we weren’t testing in these areas, people would still have the virus and without being tested, diagnosed and isolated, it could spread even further.”=== Iowa’s schools are getting a federal grant of more than 71-million dollars to help address costs related to the pandemic. Iowa Department of Education director Ann Lebo says the money comes at a critical time. “My team has been hard at work to develop and launch an application process so we can quickly and efficiently get these critical funds to our schools. I’m happy to announce that schools can access the application today through the the CASA system.” Schools will have until the close of business Monday to apply. Lebo says every one of Iowa’s 327 school districts will get a piece of the pie for programs ranging from online learning to mental health services.last_img read more