Experts at HHS webinar cite key pandemic planning issues

first_img HHS Pandemic Influenza Plan At the beginning of the webcast, HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt made some opening remarks that focused on what the agency has accomplished, especially since the release of the HHS’s Pandemic Influenza Plan in 2005. Osterholm said the private sector has so far failed in its pandemic planning efforts, because businesses haven’t taken their plans to the next level, such as establishing back-up plans in case supply chains collapse, which could have more severe effects than the pandemic virus itself. “They have to play like a chess master, and plan the next 8 to 10 moves down the board,” he said. On the vaccine-sharing issue, Leavitt said he understands the concerns that Indonesia and other countries have about access to affordable H5N1 vaccines, but he said Indonesia’s apparent demand of financial compensation for sharing virus samples is a “dangerous proposition” that could open the door to endless demands. Some of the online viewers asked the panelists how individuals and corporations can better prepare for a pandemic. Leavitt and Osterholm advised viewers to keep the issue alive by keeping dialogues on the topic going with local and state government officials. “I think we can finish our service better prepared, especially since 2005, but there is still a great deal to do,” he said. Finish work on new vaccine facilities. Remind states, businesses, and families about their responsibility to help prepare for an influenza pandemic. In terms of pandemic preparedness, Leavitt emphasized a list of the agency’s accomplishments, which include an H5N1 vaccine with aggressive efforts under way to expand vaccine production technology and capacity, an antiviral stockpile that has been amplified by a state purchase incentive plan, new diagnostic testing systems, and an array of regional pandemic planning summits and formal exercises. The compensation demand promotes a vaccine scarcity mentality, Leavitt said, “but we need to pursue an abundance mentality.” See also: Continue work on countermeasure distribution, which he said is currently the “Achilles heel” of bioterror response planning. Leavitt said he has four recommendations for the next HHS secretary, “sort of a note on the desk,” he said: Strongly defend the global influenza virus-sharing network. Leavitt also spoke to the transitions that will likely occur over the next few months as the Bush administration winds down and a new administration takes over. He said during his tenure, the HHS has planned for 15 different disaster scenarios, including pandemic influenza. After Leavitt spoke he joined the panel discussion group, which included Maggie Fox, health and science editor for Reuters news service, Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, which publishes CIDRAP News, and William Raub, PhD, Leavitt’s science advisor. He said two events loom large during his years as HHS secretary: the re-emergence of H5N1 avian influenza virus and hurricane Katrina. The storm response was, “a remarkable shakedown of our national response plan,” Leavitt said. “We’re due for a pandemic, but regrettably, we’re still somewhat underprepared,” he said. Leading the nation’s pandemic preparedness efforts has required a delicate balance, Leavitt added. “You want to stimulate preparedness, but not panic.” Oct 29, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) today hosted an online conversation among experts, government officials, and members of the public that touched on emerging issues in pandemic planning, such as anticipating supply chain interruptions and keeping the momentum going during tough economic times.last_img read more

Qatar Airways says no new planes in 2020 or 2021

first_imgQatar Airways has said it will not take any new aircraft in 2020 or 2021, deferring orders with Boeing and Airbus as demand diminishes amid the coronavirus crisis.The Gulf airline, which flew to more than 170 destinations with 234 aircraft as of March, has been hit by airport closures and travel bans imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19.The International Air Transport Association warned in April that air traffic in the Middle East and North Africa would plummet by more than half this year. “Quite a lot of (deliveries) will be deferred,” Qatar Airways chief executive Akbar al-Baker told Britain’s Sky News on Wednesday.”We have already notified both Boeing and Airbus that we will not be taking any aeroplanes this year or next year.”And all the other aircraft that we have on order, that were supposed to be delivered to us within the next two or three years, will now be pushed back to as long as nearly eight to 10 years.”If traffic increased to levels above expectation, the delayed aircraft could be brought forward, he said.The airline says it is currently serving around 40 key destinations.It has previously warned staff that they face redundancies and salary reductions as it attempts to defy the headwinds of the global aviation downturn.Qatar Airways was already battling financial turbulence, having posted a $639 million loss for the year to March 2019.Topics :last_img read more

Slump continues as Saina Nehwal slips up in first round of Denmark Open

first_imgAdvertisement c76rdyNBA Finals | Brooklyn VspcmWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Exgm( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 6kcWould you ever consider trying this?😱35iCan your students do this? 🌚zqxbuRoller skating! Powered by Firework Saina Nehwal’s rough patch continues as she crashed out yet again in the first-round during the ongoing season, this time in the Denmark Open Super 750 tournament. Saina and her hopes for further progress called it a day when Japan’s Sayaka Takahashi won through straight games in Odense on Wednesday. World No. 8 Saina has now lost in 3 successive 1st rounds but most importantly 6th overall this season.Advertisement The unseeded Sayaka Takahashi took just 37 minutes to knock out the 2012 champion of the tournament, but Saina started well and led Takahashi 7-5 in the 1st game. The Japanese shuttler dominated back after the mid-game break and took the game easily. Notably, Saina was previously knocked out during the a 1st-round of the China Open by Busanan Ongbamrungphan of Thailand back in September. Although she performed well during the beginning of the season reaching the semi-final of the Malaysia Masters and winning the Indonesia Masters; her form has been ever dipped since.Advertisement In other news, Srikanth Kidambi lost to Denmark’s Anders Antonsen in the first-round too. He was beaten by the Danish in a score of 14-21, 18-21. This was also Srikanth’s come back since his 3rd-round exit at the World Championships in August. Meanwhile, reigning world champion PV Sindhu is now in the 2nd round beating Gregoria Mariska in straight games on Tuesday, after her early exits in Korea and China Open.Sai Praneeth, Sameer Verma, Sikki Reddy and Pranaav Jerry Chopra all reached the next round in their respective categories in the tournament while Satwiksairaj Rankireddy and Ashwini Ponnappa walked off in their 1st-round match against No.2 seeds Wang Yi Lyu and Huang Dong Ping of China.Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

SANTA ANITA PICK SIX CARRYOVER OF $69,959 INTO THURSDAY; TOTAL PICK SIX POOL PROJECTED TO EXCEED $250,000

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Oct. 23, 2016)–There were no winning Pick Six tickets on Sunday at Santa Anita, creating a Pick Six carryover of $69,959 into Thursday.  Track officials project Thursday’s total Pick Six pool will exceed $250,000.With no live racing in Southern California on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, first post time for a nine-race program on Thursday is at 1 p.m.  Admission gates will open at 11 a.m.For scratches, changes and complete morning line information, please visit santaanita.comlast_img read more