ROMANO, JOSEPH JR.

first_imgA mass of Christian burial was offered March 23 at St. Ann’s RC Church, Hoboken, for Joseph Romano, Jr., 53. He passed away suddenly at his Hoboken residence on March 17. A lifelong Hoboken resident, Joe worked for many years as a security officer for the Old Navy Company, mostly in Union City. He was an avid Oakland Raiders fan as well as the New York Rangers hockey league. He enjoyed and spent much time with video game challenges. Predeceased by his parents Mildred (nee) DePalma and his father Joseph F. Romano, he is survived by his only brother, Anthony G. Romano. He will be missed by his cousins, members of the Sacci family and the Kickey family.Services arranged by the Failla-McKnight Memorial Home, Hoboken.last_img read more

Cape May County Reports Nine New Coronavirus Cases

first_img17 LOWER TOWNSHIP222553621224 CAPE MAY POINT0 TOTAL RECOVERED AVALON07 DENNIS TOWNSHIP62151262 NORTH WILDWOOD47 WEST WILDWOOD31 UPPER TOWNSHIP17372 OCEAN CITY92301 TOTAL DECEASED CAPE MAY CITY13 WEST CAPE MAY12 MIDDLE TOWNSHIP21460204 COVID-19 testing in Ocean City will be done at the Community Center’s parking lot. The Cape May County Health Department reported Tuesday that there are nine new cases of COVID-19, bringing the total number to 530, including 41 deaths.No new deaths were reported Tuesday.Cape May County Health Officer Kevin Thomas emphasized the importance of social distancing to slow the spread of the virus.“It’s important that everyone continues to practice good hand hygiene, social distancing (at least 6 feet apart) and staying home as much as possible,” Thomas said in a press release. “These strategies will best help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the community.”Following is a breakdown of the number of coronavirus cases and deaths in each municipality of the county:center_img WILDWOOD2129 SEA ISLE CITY02 32 TOTAL ACTIVE96 257 9 STONE HARBOR1 MUNICIPALITYACTIVE CASESREPORTED TODAYOFF QUARANTINEDEATHSLONG TERM CARE ACTIVE CASESLONG TERM CARE OFF QUARANTINELONG TERM CARE CENTER DEATHS WILDWOOD CREST29 TOTAL CASES IN CAPE MAY COUNTY530 WOODBINE771316 119 County health officials recommend the following safe practices:Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer (only if soap and water are not available).Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.Stay home when you are sick.Avoid contact with sick people.Avoid non-essential travel.Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions.Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are the New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int and the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov.For additional information, visit https://capemaycountynj.gov.last_img read more

Selfridges opens food hall doors to St John Bakery

first_imgSt John Bakery officially opened a new bakery in Selfridges Food Hall in London this week (17 November). It will offer the same range of products that can be found in the company’s St John Restaurants, including white and brown sourdough loaves, a raisin loaf, mini Eccles cakes and a rye loaf.The loaves will be baked at its Druid Street site in Bermondsey, which it relocated to in November last year, and delivered to Selfridges every morning.Fergus Henderson, the chef who founded St John Restaurant, St John Bread & Wine and the St John Hotel, along with restaurateur Trevor Gulliver, said: “Bread is as vital as your knife and fork at the table and we have worked hard over the years to develop delicious-tasting breads full of good ingredients. We hope Selfridges’ customers enjoy the fruits of our labour.”Ewan Venters, food and restaurants director, Selfridges, said the retailer had always seen Fergus and his team at St John as pioneers in the food industry. “Their belief in good quality produce echoes ours and we cannot wait to offer their delicious bakery experience to our customers.”last_img read more

Full Audio Of Bob Weir & The Campfire Band’s Saturday Wanee Set, Featuring Trey Anastasio

first_imgEdit this setlist | More Bob Weir setlists[photo by @kendeee] On Saturday evening of Wanee Music Festival in the beautiful Spirit of Suwanee Music Park, Bob Weir and the Campfire Band returned to the Peach Stage to headline and close out their second night of music. Traditionally with his Campfire Band shows, Weir plays a solo acoustic segment before inviting the band to join him for the rest of the first set, then again for a second. This set was no different, only the Grateful Dead guitarist welcomed a second guitarist to the stage – to the excitement of all.After opening the set with “Two Djinn” and “Corrina,” Bob Weir brought out Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio for “Deep Elem Blues,” “Friend of the Devil,” and “Bird Song.” This led into the second-ever collaboration of Big Boat tune “Miss You.” While Weir took vocals on the collaborative debut back in Nashville with Phish last summer, Trey took the lead on this one. Pure speculation leads me to believe this song was chosen to tribute Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks, who was honored throughout the weekend and would normally be playing on that stage during that time.From one surprising cover to another, the duo looked at each other and nodded before going into Lady Gaga‘s pop hit “Million Reasons.” While it clearly took the Deadhead community a while to figure out what exactly was being played, the realization set the crowd back to a point of clarity. It was an “ah-ha” moment, to say the least. This five-song segment showcased both musicians’ guitar picking as well as their vocal talents, and marked another grand moment in the history of jam band music.Following the nontraditional cover, Anastasio left the stage, with Weir pointing to him as he left and instructing the crowd to “say ‘thank you, Trey,’” an order that no one at the performance had an issue obliging. From there, the Campfire Band came out for the first time during Weir’s performance at Wanee, and together the full band worked through songs off of Weir’s new album, Blue Mountain, as well as a healthy dose of classic Grateful Dead tunes to help Bobby wrap up his headlining performance.You can check out full audio from Bob Weir’s performance, courtesy of Chris from JamBuzz, as well as full videos from Trey Anastasio’s sit-in with Bob Weir, courtesy of Suwannee HD Streams.Deep Elem BluesFriend of the DevilBird Song > Miss YouMillion Reasonslast_img read more

Anthropologist Hymes dies at 82

first_imgDell H. Hymes, 82, an influential linguistic anthropologist and folklorist who taught at Harvard from 1955 to 1960, died in Charlottesville, Va., on Nov. 13. Retiring from teaching in 2000 as the Commonwealth Professor of Anthropology and English Emeritus at the University of Virginia, Hymes will be remembered for his widespread advancement of the  field of sociolinguistics.A memorial gathering will be held at the American Anthropological Association’s national meeting Dec. 5 in Philadelphia.last_img read more

Flags displayed across University campus show LGBT support

first_imgLast weekend, LGBT alumni from Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame walked around campus for the GALA-ND/SMC reunion and were greeted with a show of support that many of them had not experienced when they were students at Notre Dame: Rainbow pride flags hung out of windows across campus, ranging from dorms to Geddes Hall, Nieuwland Hall of Science and Hesburgh Library. This show of support for the LGBT community of Notre Dame was partly out of protest of the choice of Vice President Mike Pence as the 2017 Commencement speaker.“Students and alumni came together and said ‘we’re frustrated with the invitation of Mike Pence as the Commencement speaker on many fronts certainly,” Bryan Ricketts, a fifth-year student who was involved in the flag distribution, said. “Dealing with LGBT issues dealing with funding for conversion therapy, his passage of a restrictive [law] that didn’t include a civil rights exemption when it was first written [and] at one point his professed intent to enshrine marriage between one man and one woman as a constitutional amendment.” Michael Yu | The Observer Pride flags hang from the windows of Nieuwland Hall. The flags, distributed by student groups, are being displayed as a sign of protest against this year’s Commencement speaker, Vice President Mike Pence.Last week, the student group We Stand For distributed almost 500 flags to students and faculty. Funded in part by student and alumni donations, the group bought a second round of pride flags after more alumni heard about the event on social media or read about it in  an article published April 21 and wanted to help, Ricketts said. “[The LGBT alumni wished] there could have been this overt expression of support of LGBT students when they were here,” Ricketts said. “Now that they have the opportunity to do that and show that … there is a community in the Notre Dame family who cares very deeply about the LGBT student body population.”Ricketts, who distributed some of the flags, said allies, as well as LGBT students and faculty, took flags to fly in support of a friend, roommate or family member back home.Given the number of flags currently displayed on campus, as well as the existence of student organizations such as We Stand For and PRISM, it is tempting to assume that Notre Dame is and has always been extremely accepting, when in fact, PRISM was only formed four years ago, Ricketts said.“This perception of ND as LGBT friendly has arisen in some cases so we forget that there are still large pockets of people on campus who don’t see things that way,” Ricketts said. “We’ve come a long way, certainly, but we’re still not by any means a campus that’s uniformly welcoming and inclusive towards LGBT students.”This was made clear by some negative responses both students and faculty received for flying pride flags.Junior Nicholas Furnari helped distribute flags out of the College Democrats office last week. Since then, five students who were told by either their rectors or hall staff to remove the flags from their windows have contacted Furnari to seek advice.“I talked to five different students that represent three different dorms all [on] North Quad, that just happens to be where they live,” Furnari said. “Two were told by their hall staff, by their RAs, to take them down … and the rest were told by their rectors to take them out of the window. “I don’t think it was anyone in student affairs who told them to do that. I think it was just their own personal political ideology which is upsetting because when you’re working a job with residential life, as a person with some authority, you have a responsibility to try to separate your personal beliefs from the work that you’re doing with students. Student affairs and the administrative office have always been supportive to the extent that they can be.”Furnari told the students to do nothing, and to his knowledge, none of the flags have been removed.“Very few places and buildings and dorms have actually taken them down, but it’s a little disappointing [that] in the face of what has been mostly viewed as good student organization that there’s been some animosity,” he said. “I feel like that’s not the appropriate response. When you see students rallying around a cause, you should let them do that because that’s their right as individual students.”Additionally, two graduate physics students, Devin Whitten and Kaitlin Rasmussen, were recently contacted by the secretary of Nieuland Hall of Science and told to remove the pride flag that was hanging from the window of their third floor office. “We put this flag up for Ally week and left it up during the weekend,” Rasmussen said. “I think we both got an email from someone in the main office that said ‘we got a complaint about this flag, you need to take it down.’” The email told them that it was urgent they take the flag down, as it violated University policy. This seemed strange to the graduate students who had seen flags all over campus, Rasmussen and Whitten said.“The department secretary had been told that someone who was not associated with our department, but apparently works on campus, was walking outside, saw the flag and was apparently offended enough that they felt like they needed to go inside and inform the office that it was against University policy to have a flag up in general,” Whitten said. “Supposedly it wasn’t a reaction to the fact that it was an LGBT flag, just flags in general, although I’m not sold on that.” About a week after they had taken their flag down, Whitten and Rasmussen said that they noticed flags appearing in the windows of tenured faculty of Nieuland for the flag drop.Jessica Baron, the outreach and communications coordinator for the Reilly Center for Science, Technology and Values, whose office is located in Geddes Hall, decided to participate in the flag drop as an ally to show support for a student. A few days after hanging the flag, Baron was contacted with a complaint.“I was informed that a faculty member from theology who works on the fourth floor was personally offended by it because he thought it presumed to speak on behalf of the whole building. That didn’t seem like a compelling reason to take it down, considering our spirit of inclusion statement,” Baron said.Baron contacted human resources to ask if she should take it down, and they told her she did not have to. Despite this, the faculty member is still calling for the flag’s removal, Baron said.“I appreciate that I work for a private, Catholic institution and that I won’t be in agreement on social issues 100 percent of the time, but it seems to me that we’ve made great strides to make our LGBTQ community feel safe and accepted,”  Barons said.“The flag hanging from my office window has nothing to do with anyone else on our floor or with Geddes in general. It’s merely a signal that that person whose window this is supports our LGBTQ students along with the rest of the student body. “That this is a problem is disturbing to me — a symbol of love and acceptance is offensive and misleading?”Despite these negative responses, Ricketts, Furnari and the rest of the organizers of the flag drop have said due to the large number of pride flags around campus, it was a positive experience that they hope will become an annual tradition.“I was happy in particular with the support we received from faculty and grad students,” Furnari said. “Beyond that, I think we have every dorm on campus with at least one flag … to be able to do that has been awesome. I think the vibe on campus is changing a little bit, but there’s still some tension. Small improvements add up to big improvements. I have definitely seen a change since I’ve been a student here. Every year seems to get better.”Tags: Ally Week, Flags, LGBTQlast_img read more

Colombian National Army Seizes Weapons Destined for the FARC

first_imgThe weapons were destined for the FARC’s 29th Front, which could have used the weapons to attack roads, armored vehicles, Military installations, and aircraft while in flight. In a third mission, in the municipality of Turbo in the Department of Antioquia, Soldiers with the Army’s 17th Brigade Infantry Battalion No. 47 dismantled a clandestine laboratory used by the Aurelio Rodríguez Company of the FARC’s Fifth Front to process coca paste into cocaine. The Colombian National Army recently scored a major victory against the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) by seizing an array of high-powered weapons destined for the terrorist group. The weapons were destined for the FARC’s 29th Front, which could have used the weapons to attack roads, armored vehicles, Military installations, and aircraft while in flight. The Colombian National Army recently scored a major victory against the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) by seizing an array of high-powered weapons destined for the terrorist group. The truck’s driver fled the scene before he could be apprehended. The Army did not immediately disclose which narco-trafficking group owned the laboratory or if any suspects were captured during the raid. The FARC uses proceeds from drug trafficking to finance its terrorist operations. In a third mission, in the municipality of Turbo in the Department of Antioquia, Soldiers with the Army’s 17th Brigade Infantry Battalion No. 47 dismantled a clandestine laboratory used by the Aurelio Rodríguez Company of the FARC’s Fifth Front to process coca paste into cocaine. By Dialogo February 09, 2015 Soldiers seized 10 gallons of coca syrup, 250 kilograms of coca leaves -the main ingredient used to make cocaine-, 110 gallons of gasoline, and a gallon of fertilizer, as well as other supplies. The Army did not immediately disclose whether any suspects were captured. In the operation, Soldiers with the Pegaso Task Force confiscated 16 antitank rocket-propelled grenades, a rocket launcher, and 470 grenades from an abandoned truck in the municipality of Aldana in the Department of Nariño, which borders Ecuador, according to General Luis Fernando Rojas, the Task Force Commander. The truck’s driver fled the scene before he could be apprehended. Soldiers seized 10 gallons of coca syrup, 250 kilograms of coca leaves -the main ingredient used to make cocaine-, 110 gallons of gasoline, and a gallon of fertilizer, as well as other supplies. The Army did not immediately disclose whether any suspects were captured. In a separate mission, Soldiers with Pegaso Task Force continued making strides in their counter-narcotics fight, dismantling a laboratory used to process cocaine paste in a village in Policarpa municipality, also in Nariño. Troops confiscated an array of cocaine-making equipment and supplies, including 12 kilograms of sodium nitrate. The Army did not immediately disclose which narco-trafficking group owned the laboratory or if any suspects were captured during the raid. The FARC uses proceeds from drug trafficking to finance its terrorist operations. In the operation, Soldiers with the Pegaso Task Force confiscated 16 antitank rocket-propelled grenades, a rocket launcher, and 470 grenades from an abandoned truck in the municipality of Aldana in the Department of Nariño, which borders Ecuador, according to General Luis Fernando Rojas, the Task Force Commander. In a separate mission, Soldiers with Pegaso Task Force continued making strides in their counter-narcotics fight, dismantling a laboratory used to process cocaine paste in a village in Policarpa municipality, also in Nariño. Troops confiscated an array of cocaine-making equipment and supplies, including 12 kilograms of sodium nitrate. last_img read more

SENAN Trains Naval Units in Latin America

first_imgBy Roberto López Dubois/Diálogo October 18, 2018 In early November, naval units of Latin America will head back home after a two-month training event with the Panamanian Air and Naval Service (SENAN, in Spanish) specialized in sea patrol and interdiction operations with a focus on organized crime. The International Interceptor Boat Operator Course (OBE, in Spanish), held September 3rd-November 1st at SENAN’s Naval Training School, includes units of the Panamanian National Border Service and elements of the Ecuadorian, Honduran, and Costa Rican navies and coast guards. The course seeks to strengthen knowledge of interceptor boat operators who fight narcotrafficking and related crimes and face danger at sea, because of the different characteristics of bodies of water and criminal activities. The theoretical and hands-on course also helps level the capabilities of boat operators in the region and strengthen bonds of friendship among partner nations. “This training stems from service needs due to the many interdiction and boarding operations in coastal areas,” SENAN Captain Walter Hernández Villalba, commandant of the Naval Training School, told Diálogo. “We must have highly trained personnel to conduct interdictions in waters that can suddenly become hostile for vessels and for our personnel. The creation of a program with a curriculum that provides the units we train with knowledge to better perform out there at sea was necessary.” Specialized training Classroom lessons focus on three areas: naval sciences, legal sciences, and human rights. During the hands-on training, participants put to the test everything they learned. “The operator should have the skills to intercept and reach a vessel, keeping in mind boarding and crew security,” Capt. Hernández said. “They should know how to ride waves to get near the vessel, how to land on a beach, and how to leave a beach to embark or offload personnel.” On the initial naval sciences phase, participants review basic knowledge such as navigation techniques, boat engine operation and maintenance, meteorology and organization, and unit command, among other topics. In the legal sciences portion, participants learn about international law and rules of navigation in international waters, maritime traffic regulations, security of navigational routes, and control and prevention of illegal activities. With regard to human rights, students learn about the use of force and firearms. Participants study the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international law, and international rights accords. “We learn new things and can standardize our knowledge,” Costa Rican National Coast Guard Service agent Mauricio Murillo told Diálogo. “It enables us to conduct better combined operations. We always meet at sea [with SENAN units], especially at the southern border, where we carry out some combined operations with Panama.” During the hands-on training, students refine skills in simulated interdiction and boarding operations, high-speed maneuvers, and beach landing. Participants also conduct a 24-hour survival exercise at sea, simulating an emergency situation where units use rafts and swim against the current to return to shore. “So far, I learned many tips about what to do in case of an emergency, which is very useful,” said Ecuadorean Marine Corps Corporal Richard Morales Lara. “I am really proud of learning more about the experiences they have here. Instructors are very good.” Highly qualified people The course, in its eighth edition, has 10 SENAN instructors backed with trainers from other institutions, such as the Panamanian Fire Department. Certified by the International Maritime Organization, the instructors receive part of their training to teach the course through knowledge exchanges with the Colombian Navy. They also train at U.S. Special Operations Command’s Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School in Mississippi. “I like sharing my experiences,” said SENAN Sergeant José Saldaña, an instructor specialized in engines. “Boat operators will be dealing with engines, so they have to solve any potential issues in high seas. The sea is a complex environment; you have to deal with storms, choppy waters, and conditions that need a lot of training.” SENAN’s Naval Training School carries out the OBE course yearly since its inception in 2011. The school offers other international courses, such as the Engineer Training Course and the Patrol Commander Course, recently made available to officers of the region. “Institutions need highly qualified people to operate vessels at high speeds. This is very important, because a lot of skills are necessary to avoid a suspicious vessel or make them stop,” Capt. Hernández said. “Everything related to maritime security operations to counter organized crime is of a combat nature.”last_img read more

Update on USAA RDC litigation

first_imgNAFCU In late 2017/early 2018, NAFCU began hearing from multiple credit unions that had received letters from a firm called Epicenter Law which alleged the credit union’s remote deposit capture (RDC) technology infringed on patents owned by USAA. Through these letters, USAA sought voluntary licensing fees from other financial institutions. Rather than making specific demands, these letters invited credit unions to call the firm to discuss licensing USAA patents.USAA’s efforts to recoup money it spent developing RDC technology also included filing two lawsuits against Wells Fargo last year. USAA, during litigation, went into great detail explaining how Wells Fargo used USAA’s technologies. For example, a few of the patents at issue describe methods and systems for image and criterion monitoring during the RDC process. USAA asserted that these patents solve discrete, technological problems associated with computer systems when capturing images. Ultimately, the district court agreed with USAA’s analysis pertaining to some, but not all, of the patents at issues.On November 6, 2019, in one of these two lawsuits, a jury in a Texas federal court found that Wells Fargo did infringe on USAA’s patents and awarded USAA $200 million. Wells Fargo stated it “strongly disagrees with this jury verdict and does not believe it has infringed on USAA’s patent rights,” but has yet to publicly state whether it will appeal. So what does this potentially mean for credit unions?As background, USAA started developing RDC technology in 2005 and holds numerous patents in this area. As part of its efforts, at one point USAA worked with a company called Mitek, and ultimately the two litigated and settled a dispute relating to one another’s RDC patents. The settlement apparently left both parties with their patents but also left legal questions presented in the case unresolved. continue reading »center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Bay Shore Woman Killed in Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 28-year-old Bay Shore woman was killed and a man was injured in a chain-reaction crash in Holbrook over the New Year’s holiday weekend.Suffolk County police said Melisa Umanzor was driving westbound on Sunrise Highway when her car crashed head-on with a Honda that had rear-ended a Toyota and a Nissan, spun around and came to a rest facing eastbound near exit 50 at 5 a.m. Saturday.Umanzor was taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center in East Patchogue, where she was pronounced dead. The driver of the Honda was treated for minor injuries. The drivers of the Nissan and Toyota were not injured.Fifth Squad detectives impounded the vehicles, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information to call them at 631-854-8552.last_img read more